Using ARIA Landmark Roles in WordPress

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Reading Time: 6 mins

What’s a girl to write about after so long? Why, things that she loves of course – WordPress and Accessibility. I’ve been getting to know WAI ARIA in recent months, specifically using ARIA landmark roles in WordPress. This seemed like a great place to start as it was a handful of markup to memorize in an otherwise vast amount of ARIA to learn. It’s also familiar to developers if they’ve browsed through WordPress.org themes even if they haven’t realized it yet.

Before we move on, if you’re unfamiliar with what WAI ARIA is ( ARIA for short ), I’ll direct you to W3.org’s reference first.

Reading! So. Much. Reading…

 

Now if you’re like me, and stopped reading by the second line of that massive intimidating wall of jargon, I’d advise reading something easier on the eyes ( and brain ) like the A11y project’s, “Getting Started with ARIA“. I also found this lengthy article recently, “Introduction to WAI ARIA” written by Gez Lemon, and although it’s from 2008, it cleared up a lot for me. I’d recommend giving it a read through.

Now that we have a basic understanding of what ARIA is ( not the pirate Queen of Omega* ), let’s go over what ARIA landmark roles are and how they can make our WordPress themes more accessible.

* A Mass Effect reference that I couldn’t help, but take advantage of.

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10 WordPress Things I’ve learned working with 10up

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Reading Time: 8 mins

It’s been half a year since I joined the 10up team and I’ve been learning so much about the CMS I love so far. Working with a company where I can continue my WordPress adventures full time has been a rewarding experience. I’ve met new people, dived into open source, and made new discoveries in WordPress. Since it’s long past due for a new post here on RachieVee, I’d love to share 10 WordPress things I’ve learned working with 10up – a mixture of newly discovered tools, techniques and functions!

Spoiler alert, I’ve written more than ten and there are front-end related things too. Confession, I just wanted to use the whole 10 things with 10up title.

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How to use the Button Element to improve Accessibility

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Reading Time: 8 mins

I’m still here on my ongoing mission of coding accessibly. There is one HTML element that has become a huge stepping stone for me once I learned how to properly use it. That stepping stone was the button element. What? The button element? Why the heck do we need that? Well, if you’ve ever seen code like below, or have written code like this ( points to herself ), then this post is for you:

 

To be honest, I’d been writing code like the above for years until I realized I was missing opportunities. I know other developers that also write code like the above. Why is this the case? Well, there have been some theories of ignorance and fear being the source. In my case, “semantics” was just one of those words that I didn’t come across in the beginning. I just wanted to build things that I could see. It was like trying to build a cabinet with a box full of tools without truly understanding the tools. Sure I can hammer in all the nails and call it a day. Or I can take the time to see what’s in the toolbox. Maybe I’ll find that a screwdriver might be a better tool for some areas of the end product then a hammer. In the end, using the right tools for the job will result in a higher quality product… or cabinet?

PS: Rachel is no good with analogies…

 

And semantics – what does that even mean? Take it from a gal who was thrown head first into web development from a fine arts degree and had to google words like “repository” during her first week. There’s so much lingo out there! Even now, as a more experienced dev, it makes my head spin. So let’s go over it all, shall we? How to use the button element and when it’s the right tool for the job.

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Did you miss WordCamp NYC 2015?

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Reading Time: 4 mins

WordCamp NYC came to town this past weekend on Halloween! There was candy, costumes, cupcakes, and of course – awesome speakers! It was a great way to gather a new list of influential people to follow on Twitter and a new reason to hoard all the free swag. If there’s anything I learned from last year’s WCNYC, it’s that WordCamp is only getting better. I’ve learned a lot and a lot has changed since the last time I attended a WordCamp. I’d like to share that experience along with a late Halloween treat for those who may have missed the event.

Obvious, not so obvious hint – speaker slides list! Grab your leftover candy and let’s get to it.

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How to get WooCommerce Category Info with an ID

Tutorial Difficulty Level: Advanced

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Reading Time: 8 mins

The universe has been telling me to write this post for a very long time. The first time was a year-ish ago, when I googled how to get WooCommerce category data with an ID and couldn’t find a clear answer. “Hey, this is a pain to find an answer for – this should be a blog post!” The second time was after I had posted a question on the WordPress Stack Exchange to find an answer, and then I answered it myself. “Whoa – I figured this out! I should tell people about this!”

Then that question eventually ended up earning me a “most popular question” badge. “Damn it, Rachel, people want to know about this – write a damn blog post!”

Okay, so I didn’t do it. Time passed and it was exactly yesterday ( when I began writing this post ), I was working in WooCommerce again, in the zone, went to google, and this happened:

Yep, that’s right everyone. I ended up googling the same problem I had already once resolved and ended up at the same Stack Exchange question I both asked and answered. All right, universe. You win this round.

To make sure I never ever forget I know how to do this again, I’m going to write it down! How to get the WooCommerce product category name, link, image, all the things with PHP so long as you have an ID to use, step by step, in tutorial form.

Before We Get Started:

  1. This assumes you’re familiar with PHP loops, objects and variables.
  2. This is a WooCommerce tutorial yay!
  3. I am using Advanced Custom Fields for this walkthrough, but you can use other methods like a regular Custom Field and re-work this solution to your purposes.
  4. I am getting category information on a page other than the category archive. If you’re on a category archive, check this WooCommerce documentation first for a head start. I found that the method there and the method I’m writing here are a little different depending on the template you’re working in.
  5. This solution is meant to work inside the loop.

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